How Entrepreneurs Can Lean Into Embracing Big Changes by @DeborahSweeney

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by Deborah Sweeney | Featured ContributorWe’re wrapping up more than the year as 2019 comes to a close. This is the end of a decade, the 2010s, and it’s difficult to fully predict what the next 10 years has in store for small businesses.Many entrepreneurs likely have a plan in place for Q1. They may not be too fazed by the changing calendar year. Others may see the new decade as a big opportunity to make much-needed changes to their business. These changes may be implemented quickly or they might be pushed to a later date. Making big changes is often easier said than done, so it’s not too surprising if other goals are prioritized first that are less intimidating to accomplish.What if you feel resistant to change? Is there any method you can use to lean into change without fearing all the “what ifs?” that come with it? Through my own experience, I have found that these techniques can help even the most hesitant entrepreneur make, and be, the change they wish to see.See every change as an opportunity.This is an interesting technique that I encourage all entrepreneurs to try out for at least a month. What if you viewed all changes, and mishaps, that occur in your life as opportunities? For example, let’s say that the coffeeshop you like to work out of closes down. You might be a little upset at the storefront closing and need to change your schedule. But, it might inspire you to take a new path moving forward such as joining a coworking space.See what I mean about changes? They’re really fresh starts in disguise. Try to view changes that occur within your business, both good and bad, as opportunities. Gradually, your mindset will change to see what kinds of upsides come with the changes and how you can leverage these advantages for your benefit.Surround yourself with a comforting tribe.Changes are great for growth, but sometimes too much change all at once can be a bit overwhelming. Entrepreneurs are already taught to be consistently “on,” and able to hit the ground running. However, it’s equally as important that they understand when to pause and recharge before they start running on empty.As you make changes within your business, make sure you’re not doing it all alone. Ask for help if you need it. Take breaks and use the time to get outdoors or enjoy a little “you” time. Create a support system of family members, friends, and mentors. Long-time friends and mentors are comfortable and reliable to have in your life during big changes. These individuals may act as your cheerleaders and be able to provide perspective.Clearly communicate with everyone.Do you have major changes planned for your business, but your customers and employees aren’t totally aware of what’s going on yet? They might have an inkling that something is coming, but don’t really know for sure.It’s time to get everyone on the same page. Meet with your team to share the news about upcoming changes within the business. Be fully transparent about when said changes will go into effect and how various teams will strategize to communicate the messaging with your customer base. Ask team members to come to you if they have any questions or feedback.One more pro tip? Get excited about communicating these changes with your team. If you feel less than enthusiastic about having this conversation, the vibe will ricochet off of you onto everyone else. Focus on the positive impacts that this change will have on your business. Remind everyone that change is also good. It keeps you one step ahead of the competition and positions you as an innovative thinker (and doer). Great outcomes are always produced when the team goes all in together! Deborah Sweeney is the CEO of MyCorporation.com which provides online legal filing services for entrepreneurs and businesses, startup bundles that include corporation and LLC formation, registered agent services, DBAs, and trademark and copyright filing services. You can find MyCorporation on Twitter at @MyCorporation.

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